Category Archives: Q&A

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2012 — Progress in stem cell research

***This blog has moved to a new location. Visit the new site for more posts and updates! (http://www.SomethingAboutScience.com)***

Recently, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was jointly awarded to Drs. John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka “for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent.” What does it mean to be pluripotent and why is it so important? Continue reading –>

Dr. John B. Gurdon (left) and Dr. Shinya Yamanaka (right)

 

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Filed under Health, People in Science, Q&A, Technology, What's Hot

What is a flame? — When a house catches fire…

***This blog has moved to a new location. Visit the new site for more posts and updates! (http://www.SomethingAboutScience.com)***

“FIRE!!” In the middle of the night last week, I was woken up to find a neighbor’s house fast ablaze. The entire framework crackled and was engulfed by flames which glared bright orange against the night. Fortunately, no one was hurt, as the house was under construction, and the neighboring houses had been evacuated before they, too, caught fire.

Here is an image that recapitulate the (hopefully) once-in-a-lifetime experience.

But this being a science blog, my question to you is, “What is a flame?” And better yet, can you explain flames in a way everyone, including children, can understand and enjoy learning? Continue reading –>

 

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Filed under Art in Science, Q&A

Why do onions make you cry? — the chemistry and health benefits of onions

***This blog has moved to a new location. Visit the new site for more posts and updates! (http://www.SomethingAboutScience.com)***

Español: Cebolla siendo cortada.

Many of us have cried over chopping onions. Do you know why they make your eyes water, though? Yes, yes, they have that pungent juice spraying up into your eyes. But do you know what’s in that misty juice? And don’t stop that chopping – chopping and crushing onions release health-benefiting compounds.

Let’s get straight to the point. The component in an onion that makes your eyes water is called lachrymatory factor, from Latin lacrima, or “tear.” (How appropriate is that!) Lachrymatory factor irritates the eyes and stimulate the tear glands to produce tears, much like the action of a tear gas. Continue reading –>

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Filed under Health, Q&A