Category Archives: Pique of the Week

“The Power of Kawaii” — Cute images make you more focused?

***This blog has moved to a new location. Visit the new site for more posts and updates! (http://www.SomethingAboutScience.com)***

Love all things cute? Want to be surrounded by cute things at all times? Here is a recent study that you can use as an excuse to your boss why you need cute things at work.

The study was conducted by a group in Japan, where they tested the effect of viewing kawaii images on attentiveness. Kawaii (可愛い) is a Japanese word for “cute,” also associated with affective feelings, such as the “awww” reaction when one looks at a cuddly baby. Continue reading –>

 

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Filed under Art in Science, Pique of the Week

Comparative physiology of animals in athletic performances — the Olympics of the animal kingdom?

***This blog has moved to a new location. Visit the new site for more posts and updates! (http://www.SomethingAboutScience.com)***

With the start of September, lives for many of us may be hectic – back to school, beginning of a new job, etc. Nevertheless, I hope you had a chance to enjoy a summer break before returning to busy schedule.

I have just returned from a trip to the Canadian Rockies, where I enjoyed encountering various wild animals (namely, squirrels, geese, bighorn sheep, elks, mule deer, black bear, and moose). These wildlife encounters reminded me of a review article on animal athletic performances that I had read few weeks back during London Olympics, so that I thought I might share it with you here. Continue reading –>

My exciting encounter with a moose in Jasper, Alberta, Canada.

 

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Filed under Animals in Science, Pique of the Week

Trans-Pacific transport of aerosols — North America gets an equal load of overseas aerosols as domestically emitted

***This blog has moved to a new location. Visit the new site for more posts and updates! (http://www.SomethingAboutScience.com)***

Do you fly across continents? Are you fond of imported goods? Apparently, passengers and commercial goods are not the only ones making intercontinental transits. Aerosols, or tiny particles suspended in the air, are also imported from other parts of the globe through air currents across the oceans. These aerosols include desert dust and combustion aerosols derived from biomass and fossil fuels. Continue reading –>

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Filed under Environment, Pique of the Week