Category Archives: Animals in Science

A giant squid — Caught on video for the first time

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140 years after a giant squid attacked the submarine Nautilus in Jules Verne’s masterpiece, the formidable creature has finally been caught in the act.

A giant squid in its deep-sea habitat was captured on camera for the first time ever, thanks to the efforts of the joint expedition consisting of scientists led by a Japanese zoologist, Japanese filmmakers and broadcaster, and the Discovery Channel.

A close-up image of a giant squid in the deep ocean

After the first photographs of the giant squid in the deep water appeared in 2004, obtaining video footages of the creature in its habitat had remained a challenge. The mission took the team 100 dives and 400 hours of recordings to succeed. The video was taken last summer (July 2012) in the Pacific Ocean – 1000 kilometers (600 miles) south of Tokyo, at the breath-taking depth of up to 900 meters (2950 feet). Watch the video –>

 

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Poison? Potion? — Snake venom as heart attack treatment

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Snakebites can be deadly, but their poisons could be a lifesaver.

Eastern green mamba

This glossy green snake is an Eastern green mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps), found throughout the eastern Africa. Don’t be fooled by its lack of flashy red stripes or other visual warnings: its bites are highly poisonous. While you would want to avoid venomous snakes like the green mamba out in the wild, they are a treasure trove for some medical researchers. Continue reading –>

 

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Taking part in research from seafloors to galaxies — Citizen science initiatives

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Galaxies are so large that stars can be consid...

Do you like gazing at images of galaxies? Do you like to transcribe ancient texts? Do you like to listen to whales or spot seafloor critters?

If you answered yes to any of the above, you may be on your way to making a big contribution to research projects as a “citizen scientist.”

With today’s advancement in the technology, scientists are able to obtain huge amount of data in a short period of time. For example, an underwater mapping system can take 3 million images of seafloor per day. This volume of data leaves the scientists with a dilemma; if researchers were to go through the image one by one on their own, it would take years to analyze the data. This is where citizen scientists come into play. Citizen science initiatives are crowdsourcing projects, in which the public takes part in various research projects through helping scientists deal with the flood of data. Continue reading –>

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